Nelles Manor Museum

Nelles Manor Museum is a hidden gem in the cultural and heritage landscape of Niagara.

Nelles Manor Museum celebrated its grand opening in 2016. The Manor was built between 1788 and 1798 in the settlement at The Forty by United Empire Loyalist Colonel Robert Nelles for his family.  The house became central in the political and daily life of The Forty. As a Justice of the Peace, Robert married more than 200 couples in his drawing room. The War of 1812 was fought on the grounds and lands of the Nelles family. Father, sons and brothers participated in the war protecting the Niagara frontier. The grounds have been designated as a War of 1812 battle site. Robert went on to be a member of the Upper Canada Legislature. The Forty later became Grimsby, Ontario.

The Georgian inspired home stayed in the family for four generations. In 1971 it was purchased by the Coutts family. At the time of purchase it had been sectioned into eight apartments. The young family lovely restored the house back to its former glory. The care in restoration is wonderful. They discovered the original colours and other hidden finds. Today the attic and carriage house are still residences. This makes  the Manor the longest continually inhabited  home between Niagara on the Lake and Kingston. The Coutts family then donated the Manor the people of Grimsby and Ontario in 2015 and set up the Nelles Manor Heritage House Nonprofit to preserve the house, grounds and collection.

Today the museum hosts period attire guided tours, teas, open hearth cooking classes, ghost tours,  Christmas events and much more. 

We invite you to step back in time at Nelles Manor Museum. Hope to see you soon!

Consider becoming a Friend of Nelles Manor and you will be supporting heritage and linkages to our past.

 

Site Webhttps://nellesmanor.ca/

TypeHistoric Building | Community Museum